; Whats on in Sydney and Melbourne at MiSociety Sydney Festival 2010 - Exhibitions - Whats on in Sydney and Melbourne at MiSociety content="String_we_ask_for">

Sydney Festival 2010 – Exhibitions

January 13, 2010toJanuary 30, 2010

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  • Various dates and locations – see details below
CarriageWorks: Lynette Wallworth
Acclaimed around the world as individual pieces, Sydney Festival presents Invisible by Night, Evolution of Fearlessness and Duality of Light for the first time as a trilogy designed to take each viewer on a moving, unique and singular journey. more info
MCA: Olafur Eliasson
rom light-filled environments to walk-in kaleidoscopes, Eliasson’s unique, experiential works explore the intersection between nature and science, and the boundary between the organic and the artificial. more info
Campbelltown Arts Centre, Gallery 4A and Sydney Festival: Edge of Elsewhere
Edge of Elsewhere reflects and engages with the diverse cultural mix of suburban Sydney. more info
2010 Artists
Brook Andrew (Australia)
Arahmaiani (Indonesia)
Richard Bell (Australia)
YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES (Korea)
Dacchi Dang (Australia)
Newell Harry (Australia)
Shigeyuki Kihara (Samoa/New Zealand)
Kimsooja (South Korea)
Lisa Reihana (Aotearoa New Zealand)
Khaled Sabsabi (Australia)
Wang Jianwei (China)
Parramatta Artists Studios: Bear Witness
Bear Witness explores stereotypical representations of Aboriginal peoples in North American media and popular culture, re-editing these images to create new narratives representing his experiences as an urban Aboriginal artist. more info
Seymour Centre: Circa 1979: Signal to Noise
From 1979 to 1985, parish halls, abandoned warehouses and run down apartments rumbled and screeched with new sounds during one of the most creative periods in Australia’s music history.
Avant garde, post-punk, new wave and early electronic styles of music cultivated a thriving underground scene, heard on Sydney-based labels M Squared and Volition. It was a period when ‘little bands’, such as Pel Mel, SPK, Voigt/465 and Laughing Clowns were more concerned with artistic expression and experimentation than commercial success. more info
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